Jay Fisher - World Class Knifemaker

Quality Without Compromise

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Knife Maker's Mark for Jay Fisher Knives
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"Tharsis Intense" in mirror polished and hot blued O1 high carbon tungsten vanadium tool steel blade, hand-engraved 304 stainless steel bolsters, Fossilized Stromatolite Gemstone handle, sheath in leather inlaid with black frogskin, stands of sculpted, hand-cast bronze
Tharsis

Featured Publications and Articles of Jay Fisher's Knives

"Grim Reaper" push dagger, obverse side view in blued O1 high carbon tungsten-vanadium tool steel blade, hand-engraved nickel silver bolsters, Australian Black Jade gemstone handle, stingray inlaid in hand-carved leather sheath, kydex, aluminum, nickel plated steel sheath

My knives in print

My knives and knife making career have been featured in different publications and articles over the decades, and as new articles come up, I'll try to list them on this page. Public exposure in magazines, publications, and articles helps to establish the long view of a knife maker's career, his endurance, his exposure, and his esteem. This may be critical mainly to his knife investors. A copy of this printed material may be a worthwhile accompaniment to each art piece in the collection. It's also important to verify the maker's longevity (by the age of the printed articles), his recognitions, and his direction.

The inclusion of these sources on articles and publications about my work and career as an artist do not represent any endorsement or validation of the sources themselves. I have not requested, paid for, or commissioned these reviews, publications, and articles in any way. I have no direct, business, or professional association with any of these sources.

Once in while I get asked why my work has not been more often featured in the popular magazines. I have had several mentions and photos published in them, but not often. I believe it is because I don't advertise there, seek publication or attention there, and am simply not part of that scene. My scene is the internet and this web site, and has been for about 20 years. Most magazines are hurting because of the change to the net, and I do believe that this is where the future resides.

Since the internet is the future of businesses and artistic endeavors like mine, should I list the many articles, locations, and links where my work can be found on the internet? Though I've featured a few here, I'm not doing this in great detail because you who are reading this have access to the greatest part of the World Wide Web there is, and that is search engines. You can plug my name and the word knives into any search engine and come across dozens of articles, features, mentions, and comments about my work and career.

For each link and location that search engines suggest, please evaluate them carefully. There is a lot of misinformation there, some outright lies about my work, and even a few scams using my name and knives. This happens to everyone who has created a meaningful presence in their trade, craft, and art, and I'm no different. For detailed information about these negative references, please take a look at my Business of Knifemaking page where they are detailed for the truth.

Overall, my career in knifemaking has been more than I imagined; I'm honored by those who appreciate, value, use, and collect my knives, and by all those who support me by reading this web site.

An established knife maker works continually on these three public E's: endurance, exposure, and esteem.


The Gun Digest Book of Knives, 4th Edition, 1992
The Gun Digest Book of Knives, 1992

One of the earliest featured articles of my work was done by Roger Combs back in 1992. He did a two page article on me titled "Jay Fisher Knives - Built To Last." This was written when I lived in Farmington, New Mexico, along with several other well-known makers of the time. Roger had interviewed me at the California Knife Collector's Club show in Pasadena, one of the best annual shows I ever attended. He used much information from my brochure of the time, and inserted four photos of my knives: Willow Bird and Trout knives, a Desert Storm Commemorative, a New Orleans dagger, and a Bowie. It's interesting to note that I had been making knives for over ten years before anyone noticed... this is why one old maker told me that I'd have to be making a decade before anyone took me seriously! Below are three of the four photos that were in the article.

Thumbnail of photos in article
"Willow" early works, bird and trout knives featured in 1992 Gun Digest Book of Knives article "Desert Storm" commemorative knife featured in Gun Digest Book of Knives, 1992 "Bowie, circa 1990" featured in Gun Digest Book of Knives, 1992

Knives Annual, 1992 - Present
Knives Annual, 1992

The earliest printing of photos of my knives in the Knives Annual was in 1992. That is when I started submitting photographs to this annual knife publication. Back then, it was edited by Ken Warner. You can probably pick up any Knives Annual from 1992 to the present and find a couple photos of my knives, as I submit every year.

Some call this device a vanity publication, as the photos are submitted by knife makers for their own benefit of publicity. This may be true, but not all photos get published.

It was interesting to me that the first photo of one of my knives they published was of my Daysailor sailing knife with marlinspike, a knife I rarely make, and not one typical of my style or type of work. It was clear over the years that they liked to publish selections of my knives that were not the norm, and some of my unusual works seemed to make it there.

I won't include thumbnail photos of all the knives featured over the years in the knives annual; there are too many to include here.


Knives Illustrated, Fall 1992, Volume 6, Number 4
Knives Illustrated, Fall 1992

Bud Lang, the editor of Knives Illustrated magazine, approached me at a knife show and asked about my gemstone handled knives. He requested information about stone handled knives, and I gave him a good deal of info. He used the info in the article, detailing my use of gemstone in knife handles, and calling me one of the most prolific makers of gemstone handled knives. He quoted me quite a bit, and included works by some of my contemporaries at the time, friends like Norm Levine.

It's interesting to me that this is one of the most detailed articles I've ever read in any knife magazine about gemstone knife handles and their use, and their value and place in the world of knives. It was written almost 25 years ago. To guys who say gem handles have not been around in modern times, this is proof of that misconception.

The two knives featured in this article are my Altar of Atlantis and Pacifica. Also included were photos of some of my equipment: a trim saw, small diamond and silicon carbide grinding bits, my 20 inch lap, and my 18 inch diamond slabbing saw

Thumbnail of knife photos in article
"Altar of Atlantis" in ATS-34 high molybdenum stainless steel blade, carved brass fittings, Elephant ivory and Malachite gemstone handle, stand of brass, sodalite gemstone, quartz geode, sandstone base "Pacifica" Fine knife sculpture in stainless steel, ivory, 24kt gold, nickel silver, banded jasper/hematite, pyratized ammonite fossils, brown alabaster, obsidian, bubinga hardwood, nylon

New Mexico Magazine, October 1999 issue
New Mexico Magazine, October 1999

The first New Mexico Magazine article that I was featured in, along with other area artists, was about Magdalena, New Mexico. The article's slant was to show how local artists could revitalize the local community by their presence. The article had a good picture of me holding the  Firewind Wakisashi, mentioned my more famous clients, and called me an "internationally recognized master knife craftsman."

Thumbnail of photo in article

New Mexico Outdoor Writer's & Photographers Association, September 2001
2001 Writer's New Mexico Outdoor Writer's and Photographers Association

Published in a post-conference update, this picture holding a Rapier/Parrying dagger custom combination. Some accompanying text:
"Leaving the hotel, a surprise visit to Magdalena's Enchanted Spirits Studio introduced conferees to Jay Fisher - Knife maker, photographer, and writer. Fisher displayed and discussed his varied works..."

It's always nice to visit with fellow writer's, photographers, and artists. In the photo, I'm holding the recently completed Warrior's Quill, a rapier and parrying dagger.


New Mexico Magazine, October 2005
New Mexico Magazine, October 2005

New Mexico Magazine has featured me before (see above). This was a short article titled "High Plains Art; Clovis, Portales A Cut Above" about the artists in the high plains eastern area of our state, and in the article I am listed as the area's most famous artist. The magazine included one picture, and misnamed me in the photo caption as "Jack Fisher." The picture that they used is of my Alamo Bowie which has little to do with New Mexico, but its selection is typical for editors and writers, because when they think of western knives, they typically think of the stereotypical bowie knife. They had also reversed the image so the reverse side appears as the obverse...

Thumbnail of knife photo in article
"Alamo" Bowie Knife, commemorative, in etched 440C high chromium stainless steel blade, hand-engraved brass fittings, quartz with pyrite gemstone, ebony, brass, red fiber spacer handle, locking kydex, aluminum, stainless steel sheath

Blade Magazine, February 2006
Blade Magazine, February 2006

The February issue of Blade Magazine feature a black and white picture of my face and one of my Raptor kerambits in their Knifemaker Showcase. The Raptor Kerambit pictured in color and clear rendition are linked in the thumbnail photo below.

Thumbnail knife photo in article
"Raptor" kerambit in 440C high chromium stainless steel blade, hand-engraved 304 stainless steel bolsters, Red River Jasper gemstone handle, Red Stingray skin inlaid in hand-carved leather sheath

Knifemakers Database, June 2006
Knife Makers Database
Featured Knifemakers on Knife Makers Database

Though I don't typically list internet publications, this site featured a substantial article by Joe Clements on my career, knives, and history, with several pictures.

Thumbnails of knife photos in article
"Dragonslayer" and slaying the black dragon of cancer, made to honor Dr. Steven Rosenberg, Head of Oncology, National Institutes of Health "Amethystine" dagger in 440C high chromium stainless steel blade, diffusion welded copper, nickel silver fittings, Lace Amethyst, sterling silver handle with Amethyst crystal, Ponderosa Pine burl and Red Oak stand "Ariel" custom Athane Dagger in hand-engraved 440C high chromioum stainless steel blade, sterling silver and nickel silver in fluted twist Nephrite Jade gemstone handle, pommel if 304 stainless steel and Italian green goldstone gemstone handle, hand-tooled leather sheath "Forest King" dagger in 440C high chromium stainless steel blade, Copper, nickel silver diffusion welded guard and pommel, Chrysocolla gemstone, copper, sterling silver handle

Persimmon Hill, October 2006
Persimmon Hill, the Magazine for the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum

Featured in the Autumn 2006 Issue of Persimmon Hill, the magazine for the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum

Johnny D. Boggs, the award-winning western writer and author honored me with a visit to my studio in 2005, and interviewed me for an article for Persimmon Hill, the fine art publication of the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum. By the time he left, I'd probably overwhelmed him with knife facts, details, and history, but he was able to package the information in an interesting, five page article about me and my work, with 14 beautiful glossy printed photos. Persimmon Hill is a beautiful quarterly glossy magazine with fascinating features about the west, and the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum is a must-see in the heart of the west, Oklahoma City. I'm proud to be honored by such a publication, resource, and affiliation. Learn more about Johnny and his writing accomplishments on his website here. You can learn more about the Museum at their website here: The National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum

The response to this article was great. If you are a previous or current knife client, you need to get a copy of this magazine for your investment, and keep it with your Jay Fisher knife paperwork. If you're lucky enough to have purchased one of these knives, your knife is now featured in an outstanding art publication and article, and you need to get a copy to keep with your knife! If you want a copy, or are interested in my work, or have a Jay Fisher knife and want to add interesting documentation to your investment, you may be able to purchase a copy at the museum website. Be sure to ask for the Autumn 2006 issue.

Thumbnails of Knife Photos in Magazine
"The Cattleman" in etched ATS-34 high molybdenum stainless steel blade, hand-engraved 304 stainless steel bolsters, Petrified wood jasper gemstone handle, base of polished cow horn, amaranth hardwood "Freedom's Promise" obverse side view in hand-engraved 440C high chromium stainless steel blade, blued steel guard and pommel, ivory, opals, sodalite, jasper, quartz, crocidolite handle, hand-carved leather sheath with gold wash "Pecos II", obverse side view in ATS-34 high molybdenum stainless steel blade, hand-engraved carbon steel bolsters, New Mexico Jasper gemstone handle, shark skin inlaid in hand-carved leather sheath "Bulldog" obverse side view, USMC custom tactical combat knife in etched 440C stainless steel blade, 304 stainless steel bolsters, Cocobolo hardwood handle, kydex, aluminum, blued steel sheath "Raptor" kerambit in 440C high chromium stainless steel blade, hand-engraved 304 stainless steel bolsters, Red River Jasper gemstone handle, Red Stingray Skin inlaid in hand-carved leather sheath "Amethystine" dagger in 440C high chromium stainless steel blade, diffusion welded copper, nickel silver fittings, Lace Amethyst, sterling silver handle with Amethyst crystal, Ponderosa Pine burl and Red Oak stand "Bowie Classic" older/early work in hand-engraved 440C high chromium stainless steel blade, hand-engraved brass guard, pommel, fittings, Madagasscar Rosewood hardwood handle, stand of Wenge hardwood with etched steel nameplate USAF Pararescue "Creature" in mirror polished etched 440C stainless steel blade, 304 stainless steel bolsters, Guayabillo hardwood handle, kydex, aluminum, blued steel sheath with engraved flashplate "Polaris" linerlock folding knife, obverse side view: hand-engraved 440C high chromium stainless steel blade, 304 stainless steel bolsters, jasper and hematite gemstone handle, 6AL4V anodized titanium liners "Patriot" Special Forces Army commemorative in etched 440C high chromium stainless steel blade, 304 stainless steel bolsters, Cherry Blossom Jasper gemstone handle, locking kydex, aluminum, stainless steel sheath with engraved red lacquered brass flashplate "PJLT" United States Air Force Pararescue commemorative knife in etched, gold, 440C high chromium stainless steel blade, 304 stainless steel bolsters, Sodalite gemstone handle, locking kydex, aluminum, stainless steel sheath "Pacifica" Fine knife sculpture in stainless steel, ivory, 24kt gold, nickel silver, banded jasper/hematite, pyratized ammonite fossils, brown alabaster, obsidian, bubinga hardwood, nylon "Cygnus" obverse side view in 440C high chromium stainless steel blade, 304 stainless steel bolsters, Orbicular Jasper gemstone handle, hand-carved, tooled, and laced leather sheath

Best of the West Sourcebook, 2007 (Best Living Knifemaker)
2007 Best of the West Sourcebook, listing Jay Fisher as the "Best Living Knifemaker"

Listed on page 19 of the 2007 Best of the West Source book published by True West Magazine, I was honored to be listed as the Best Living Knifemaker.

From the sourcebook: "Many fine knifemakers exist in the world. Some Excel at making weapons, others at creating art. At his Enchanted Spirits Studio in Clovis, New Mexico, Jay Fisher does both. In the blade business since 1988, Fisher makes knives, many featuring gemstone handles, for collectors, museums and people who really know how to use 'em (101st Airborne, Special Forces, USAF Pararescue)."

If you own one of my knives, or you plan to get one, you need a copy of this important reference and resource for your collection. Go to their website to order one .


Blade-Damask Magazine (Russia) 2007
"Blade-Damask Russian Knife Magazine, 2007

In the Blade-Damask Magazine from Russia, dedicated to knife and blade diversity in all its forms, my Grim Reaper push dagger was featured on page 88. The author, Dmitry Samoylov included the Reaper in his article on push daggers. Many thanks to him for his international interest and publication.

Thumbnail of knife featured in article
"Grim Reaper" combat grade tactical push dagger: bead blasted and hot blued O-1 high carbon tool steel alloy blade, carbon steel bolsters, micarta handle, kydex, aluminum, blued steel sheath

Artisans of the Valley, July 2009

Artist Eric Saperstein writes on his professional blog and periodical about the investment value of fine custom handmade knives by established professional knife makers for Artisans' fine handcrafted custom woodworking. Coming from a fine artist and craftsman, his evaluation of marketing and knife investment value is clear, concise, and descriptive, illuminating the investment potential of fine handcrafted knives. Eric is an established master in his field. Please take some time to visit his site and examine his beautiful work.Custom Solid Quarter Sawn Oak Gothic Library Table (Desk) by Artisans of the Valley The article details the building of the Artemis knife, and all the steps with photos I supplied for the article. Link to the final part (11 of 11) in Artisan's Review: Finishing Artemis

Here is an example of the work by Artisans of the Valley, based in Pennington, NJ. They are an exclusive custom furniture, cabinetry, carving, and restoration shop. These craftsmen are the last of the traditional apprenticeship method of passing on the skills of furniture design, joinery, carving, and finishing. They offer custom furniture by commission.

Thumbnail of knife featured in article
"Artemis" obverse side view: CPMS30V high vanadium stainless tool steel blade, 304 stainless steel bolsters, Red River Jasper gemstone handle, ostrich leg skin inlaid in hand-carved leather sheath

Blade Magazine, December 2010
Blade Magazine, December 2010

The December 2010 issue of Blade Magazine featured in their "What's New" section one of my Phlegra Khukris custom made for a field artillery soldier serving in Afghanistan. Below is the thumbnail of the khukri and the link to a special page with more information, details, and photographs of this knife. It's actually part of a pair of tactical combat knives. See the page below.

Thumbnail knife photo in article
"Phlegra" custom combat, tactical knife, obverse side view in blued O1 high carbon tungsten-vanadium tool steel blade, 304 stainless steel bolsters, canvas Micarta phenolic handle, kydex, aluminum, blued steel sheath with engraved flashplate
More about this Phlegra Tactical Combat Knife

FF Journal (Professional Metal Fabricating and Forming Publication)
Click here to go to FFJournal.net, the online magazine for the metals fabricating and forming industry

It's always nice to get recognized in a professional trade journal. In April, 2012, I was featured in an interview article by Julie Sammarco of FF Journal. This is the online magazine for today's metal fabricating and forming technologies. The article featured photos of Aeolus (on the home page splash), Aegir, Imamu, Pacifica, and Desert Wind knives. Because the article was shortened due to FF Journal space requirements, I've included the entire interview on a special page on my site at this bookmark.

Please click on thumbnail photos and links

Knives Illustrated, December 2013

Knives Illustrated Magazine, December 2013 I was interviewed by Bethany Miller of Knives Illustrated Magazine about the steel I use in my knives, for an article published in December 2013's issue starting on page 66, titled, "Metal Worth Its Mettle." They interviewed a host of knife manufacturers including CAS Iberia, SOG Knives, Victorinox Swiss Army, W.R.Case, Camillus, and Fox Knives USA. I was the only individual knife maker queried. They also included a photo of my Chef's Set in CPM154CM and petrified palm wood gemstone handles. Ms. Miller asked what steel I preferred and why, and this is my complete response (they deleted the text in red):

"The modern, full time professional knifemaker may use many types of steel for blades, and others for fittings, bolsters, guards, ancillary devices, sheaths, and stands. In my studio these materials define a system, not simply a cutting edge. Currently, I use over a dozen different types of steel for my blades, and half a dozen types of pattern welded damascus. The decision of the type of steel chosen for any particular project involves the ultimate knife client, user, or owner. The modern knife buyer of fine custom handmade knives is well-educated on the modern steel choices and options, and it is my job to answer all of his questions and satisfy his custom needs. I use three different categories and twelve different specific features to determine the blade type, all detailed on the web site."

"It’s important to know that there is no ultimate, super steel; if there were, it would replace all others in the industrial, military, and medical fields, and thus, be reflected in knifemaking. Each steel has its pros and cons. Ultimately, performance of a particular steel for a specific application is more determined by the correct, certain, and accurate heat treating, hardening and tempering, and processing of the blade than the simple choice. I’ve always believed that steel treatment is the sole responsibility of the knifemaker; it is through this technical course of actions he understands the steel, its advantages and limitations, as well as all of its performance aspects. With years of client feedback, the maker can tune, adjust and improve these processes as he continues to make. This is why I have a host of ovens, some with rapid ramp capability, inert gas infusion, digital controllers, and accurate and calibrated regulating and testing equipment."

Of course, the entire string of text was a bit long for their copy, so they truncated and condensed my comments, but they got the direction of my response.

Thanks to Ms. Miller and her team!
Please click on thumbnail and link of chef's set featured in article:

The photo caption was:

"These Fisher custom chef knives are made from CPM154CM, a particularly high quality steel."


Knives Illustrated, January/February 2014

Knives Illustrated Magazine featuring article on Jay Fisher, page 76 For the January/February issue of 2014's Knives Illustrated Magazine, I was featured in an article titled, "An Old Craft, a New Era". The article was written by Ben Nagy, who asked some interesting questions about how I started, grew, and operate my professional business of making some of the best knives in the world. The article describes my beginning, how I transitioned from hobbyist to professional, who I make for and what I make. The editors and staff of KI were kind to preview the article on pages 9 and 47 with large photos of my "Domovoi" and "Horus" SEAL Team knife. Featured in the article are the "Tribal" sculptural knife and the "Anzu" tactical combat knife. Also is a photo of my face. It's a great article and Ben and KI did a good job and have my thanks.

You can read the complete text of the interview without the edits on this special page on the website. Of course, they had to cut it down to fit their format, and I appreciate the effort required to preserve and present the critical points.

Thanks to Ben Nagy, Bethany Miller, and the staff!
Please click on photos of these knives featured in the lead-up pages and in the article
"Domovoi", obverse side view in ATS-34 high molybdenum stainless steel blade, hand-engraved 304 stainless steeel bolsters, African dumortierite gemstone handle, hand-carved, tooled, hand-dyed leather sheath
Domovoi (Page 9)
"Horus" obverse side view in ATS-34 high molydenum stainless steel blade, 304 stainless steel bolsters, engraved, Micarta phenolic handle, locking kydex, aluminum, stainless steel sheath with black lacquered brass engraved flashplate.
Horus (Page 47)
"Tribal" in hand-engraved 440C high chromium stainless steel blade, hand-engraved 304 stainless steel bolsters, Pilbara Picasso Jasper gemstone handle, sheath of hand-carved, hand-dyed leather shoulder, stand of 304 stainless steel, American black walnut, mesquite, lauan hardwoods, engraved black lacquered brass
Tribal (Page 76)
"Anzu" fine combat, tactical knife, obverse side view in CPMS30V high vanadium tool steel blade, 304 stainless steel bolsters, Tiger Stripe G10 fiberglass epoxy laminate composite handle, digi-camo desert kydex locking sheath with ultimate extender package and accessories
Anzu (Page 78)

Other Articles and Sources

There are many places you can see my work, just do an internet search using the terms Jay Fisher and Knives. You'll see quite a few locations and resources of my career and pursuits. If you come across a substantial article or mention of my work in a publication or online resource that I should include, please let me know.

I'm honored to be in any source or article, and I could not do this without the help and support of people who browse this site, my clients, patrons, friends, and family.

Thanks for taking the time to be here!


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Funny Letters and Emails, Pg. 1       440C: A Love/Hate Affair  
Funny Letters and Emails, Pg. 2       ATS-34: Chrome/Moly Tough  
Funny Letters and Emails, Pg. 3 D2: Wear Resistance King
Funny Letters and Emails, Pg. 4       O1: Oil Hardened Blued Beauty  
Funny Letters and Emails, Pg. 5       Heat Treating and
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Knife Blade Steels
 
Funny Letters and Emails, Pg. 6       Cities of the Knife  
        Knife Shop/Studio, Page 1  
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